Sleeping, Probably.
365 Films in 2012
260. Terminator 2: Judgment Day (dir. James Cameron, USA, 1991)
John Connor (Edward Furlong), now a kid of ?? years of age, is threatened once again by Skynet from the future. They send a new T-1000 (Robert Patrick) from the future to kill him, so he sends a Terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) back in time to save… himself. Also, his mother (Linda Hamilton) is here again.
I think this might be my favourite James Cameron film. It’s not as sleek and brutal as the first Terminator, and it’s not as quotable as Aliens, but it uses all of Cameron’s strengths and also manages (sometimes) to make a virtue of his weaknesses. The main problem is that Cameron seems to genuinely have no idea when he’s using a cliche - he has no self-awareness to stop him from using lines like “We’ve got company!”, or to just not do silly things like ruin his big emotional pay-off ending with a laugh-out-loud hilarious cheesy thumbs-up. Also, all of his characters are constructed for maximum cool, and therefore never really feel like actual people. But: it’s a good story, with a good look, and Linda Hamilton is great, even if she doesn’t get as good a climactic line as she did in the first film.
Verdict: very enjoyable -equal parts visionary and cliché

365 Films in 2012

260. Terminator 2: Judgment Day (dir. James Cameron, USA, 1991)

John Connor (Edward Furlong), now a kid of ?? years of age, is threatened once again by Skynet from the future. They send a new T-1000 (Robert Patrick) from the future to kill him, so he sends a Terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) back in time to save… himself. Also, his mother (Linda Hamilton) is here again.

I think this might be my favourite James Cameron film. It’s not as sleek and brutal as the first Terminator, and it’s not as quotable as Aliens, but it uses all of Cameron’s strengths and also manages (sometimes) to make a virtue of his weaknesses. The main problem is that Cameron seems to genuinely have no idea when he’s using a cliche - he has no self-awareness to stop him from using lines like “We’ve got company!”, or to just not do silly things like ruin his big emotional pay-off ending with a laugh-out-loud hilarious cheesy thumbs-up. Also, all of his characters are constructed for maximum cool, and therefore never really feel like actual people. But: it’s a good story, with a good look, and Linda Hamilton is great, even if she doesn’t get as good a climactic line as she did in the first film.

Verdict: very enjoyable -equal parts visionary and cliché

  1. thechildmonster said: Childhood film, this one.
  2. infinitybuttons posted this